Effects of origin and storage method on the germinative capacity of ponderosa pine seed
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Effects of origin and storage method on the germinative capacity of ponderosa pine seed

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Published by Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Seeds,
  • Storage,
  • Ponderosa pine

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJames D. Curtis
SeriesResearch note / Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service -- no. 26, Research note (Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)) -- no. 26.
ContributionsIntermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
The Physical Object
Pagination5 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25581021M
OCLC/WorldCa79966278

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Effects of origin and storage method on the germinative capacity of ponderosa pine seed / By James D. Curtis and Utah) Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden. Abstract. no.2 Topics: Ponderosa pine, Seeds, Storage. Effects of stratification and temperature on seed germination speed and uniformity in central Oregon ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) Book January with 44 Reads How we. Variation in speed of seed germination was investigated among ponderosa pine trees representing locations in central Oregon. Results suggested that at least some of the geographic variation is. Abstract. This chapter summarizes current technology concerning cone collection and seed processing, testing, storage, and stratification for the six major conifer species—Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine, noble fir, white fir, and western hemlock—produced as seedlings in .

  We compared carbon storage and fluxes in young and old ponderosa pine stands in Oregon, including plant and soil storage, net primary productivity, respiration fluxes, eddy flux estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and Biome‐BGC simulations of young forest (Y site) was previously an old‐growth ponderosa pine forest that had been clearcut in , and the old forest (O . Stratification was shown to have a greater effect on the rate of germination than on the germinative capacity. The longer the stratification period the less sensitive the seed was to incubation temperature. The shorter stratification periods (30 and 40 days) showed little or no significant effect on the rate of germination of the relatively. All results are based on the average ±SD of six independent NMR experiments (replicates). Each replicate contained a single seed for western white pine, ponderosa pine, and loblolly pine, and 12 seeds for lodgepole pine. From analysis of the NMR spectra . In a study of the problems met in testing germination of coniferous tree seed, special attention is given to the variability between different seedlots of the same species. Known and suspected causes for this variability are discussed. These include seed source, genetic constitution of individual trees, seed maturity, treatments during the commercial extraction process and storage conditions.

3. improve the germinative energy and germinative capacity of the seed collected. All three objects can be achieved by one simple treatment, that is, the careful selection of seed trees and the complete isolation of the crowns of these seed trees by thinnings. New Forests () –49 DOI /s Springer The effects of seed mass on germination, seedling emergence, and early seedling growth of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) WILLIAM C. PARKER1,*, THOMAS L. NOLAND1 and ANDRE´E E. MORNEAULT2 1. Forest inventory data on ponderosa pine plots in Oregon show that the greatest proportion of plots exist in stands ∼ years old, indicating that a majority of stands are approaching maximum carbon storage and net carbon uptake. Our data suggests that NEP averages ∼ 70 g C m −2 year −1 for ponderosa pine forests in Oregon. About. California black oak is most common in Pacific ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa; hereafter, ponderosa pine) and mixed-conifer forests, where it is more often an associated than a dominant species [,]. California black oak cooccurs with ponderosa pine throughout nearly all of California black oak's distribution [61,].